Letter: Advice for graduates
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Letter: Advice for graduates

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Congratulations to the class of 2020. I know many had your prom canceled and you may not be able to walk with your classmates, but that’s OK; you will be able to talk to them either through Skype, Zoom, Facebook Live and Snapchat.

You will receive your diploma through what your generation calls snail mail. Or as I call it, the United States Postal Service. Who would ever have thought that you would be the class that would experience a worldwide pandemic, but you’ll get through it. After all, you have many technologies at your disposal, which I never did as a graduate of the Maquoketa Community High School Class of 1998.

When I graduated, they were talking about the Y2K bug which would have meant all computers in the world would crash at the stroke of midnight January 1, 2000.

They say 2020 is perfect vision, so with that in mind use that to your advantage. In whatever field you desire, whether it's to become a politician or even to find a vaccine for COVID-19, here are some things to consider:

1. Listen to your parents.

2. Listen to your elected officials, and if they tick you off, contact them through Twitter or Facebook.

3. Listen to your bosses if you are entering the workforce; or for those attending college in the fall, listen to your professors.

With that, I say good luck

Richard E Stimmel

Maquoketa

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Until Donald Trump came along Herbert Hoover was the poster child for presidents failing to meet unprecedented success challenges. The similarities in both men’s backgrounds and philosophies on governing are interesting. Both men came from business backgrounds, Hoover minus the multiple bankruptcies.

Congratulations, Roby Smith, on getting mail-in ballots more under control by the Iowa Republican Party. I suppose this is in line with President Trump’s campaign to help control the voting process to make sure our representation keeps fulfilling minority interests.

Headline in today's QC Times: "COVID-19 continues to surge; health officials say some young people are lax about precautions." How about the people who recommend no precautions? Like our governor who says of our schools: Masks are not recommended. Is if fair to call young people lax when they don't have the means to protect themselves? They have two means available: Stay home and wash their hands. Those are extremely effective. But so are masks, especially in stopping the spread of the disease. Don't blame the young people when the leaders mislead them.

Last weekend, my fiance and I attended an adult fastpitch softball tournament in Walcott, Iowa. Trying to social-distance ourselves from the unmasked home-team crowd, we moved our bleacher seats to the visitors' side. The "visitors" were a team from Chicago, consisting of Hispanics and Black players. Since it was too hot to sit in the dugout, they and their fans were camped in the grass near the seating area we chose. They quickly befriended us. For the next six hours they kept up a lively round of chatter, enjoying our occasional comments. Several times I nearly fell off the bleachers laughing at their good-natured humor.

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