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The Ethical Life podcast: What does it mean to be a good COVID citizen?
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The Ethical Life podcast: What does it mean to be a good COVID citizen?

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Episode 26: Richard Kyte and Scott Rada talk about the unpredictable nature of the pandemic and whether our lives can return to normal anytime soon. Next they discuss the Kyle Rittenhouse verdict and how moral outrage often ignores the law. And in the third segment, they look at a recent survey that asked young people in 21 countries about their futures.

Links to stories discussed during the podcast:

The Lionization of Kyle Rittenhouse by the right, by Meredith McGraw of Politico

Where Are Young People Most Optimistic? In Poorer Nations. by Claire Cain Miller and Alicia Parlapiano of the New York Times

The Changing Childhood Project survey by UNICEF

About the hosts: Scott Rada is social media manager with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wis.

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