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KHARTOUM, Sudan (AP) — The Latest on developments in Sudan (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

The United Nations human rights office says a monitoring team should be deployed quickly to Sudan to examine alleged violations during this week's military crackdown.

A spokesman said Friday that the U.N. rights office is seeking the cooperation of Sudan's government to deploy the monitoring mission.

The spokesman in Geneva said the U.N. is "gravely concerned" about the situation in Sudan after more than 100 people were killed this week.

The office is urging authorities to investigate the use of "excessive force" against protest camps, including the alleged involvement of the Rapid Support Forces and members linked to atrocities in Sudan's Darfur region.

The office says that "accountability is crucial to avoid further bloodshed."

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4:05 p.m.

A leader in Sudan's protest movement says his group and Ethiopia's prime minister have exchanged proposals on how to resolve the ongoing conflict with Sudan's ruling military council.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is visiting Sudan to mediate between the protesters and the military. The meeting comes amid a deadly military crackdown on the protesters now in its fourth day.

In a phone interview with Saudi-owned satellite channel al-Arabiya, protest leader Gaafar Hassan refused to reveal details of the discussion, saying they will be unveiled at a news conference. Hassan is a head of the Forces for the Declaration of Freedom and Change, a coalition of political groups representing the protesters.

Hassan added that Abiy listened to protesters' version of the latest deadly developments in Sudan, which have left more 113 dead and more than 500 injured.

Hassan has reiterated the FDFC's strong objections to holding any "direct" or "indirect" talks with the ruling military council, which took over the country after mass protests drove longtime dictator Omar al-Bashir from power in April.

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3:35 p.m.

The office of Ethiopia's prime minister says he has stressed unity during his efforts to mediate between Sudan's ruling military and the country's protest leaders.

The office posted photos of a smiling Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed meeting with leaders of the Forces for the Declaration of Freedom and Change, a coalition of political groups and parties representing the protesters.

He also held talks earlier Friday with Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, the head of Sudan's ruling military council, in Khartoum.

Abiy's office says he stressed that "a prerequisite for restoring peace in Sudan is unity."

The visit by the Ethiopian leader comes a day after the African Union continental body, based in Ethiopia, suspended Sudan over this week's deadly crackdown on protesters.

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12:40 p.m.

Sudanese protest leaders are demanding the dismantling of a paramilitary unit they hold responsible for the violent crackdown on their rallies that killed more than 100 people this week.

The Forces for the Declaration of Freedom and Change, a coalition of political groups representing protesters, said in a statement late Thursday that the Rapid Support Forces should be dissolved and their weapons handed over to the army.

The paramilitary force grew out of the feared Janjaweed militias used in Darfur.

The opposition also renewed its demand that the military immediately hand over power to civilians. The statement came out ahead of the arrival of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who hopes mediate between the Sudanese military and protesters.

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12:20 p.m.

An analyst on Africa says he believes Ethiopia's reformist prime minister stands a "much better chance" than anyone else in bringing the two sides in Sudan's crisis together.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is visiting Sudan on Friday and talking to the ruling military as well as the country's protest leaders.

Awol Allo, a lecturer in law at Keele University in Britain, says Abiy "brings a lot to the table, from his own experience of leading a complex transition to a massive amount of positive energy, and the weight of Ethiopia's power within the region."

Abiy took power in April 2018 and quickly announced sweeping political and economic reforms. He also has taken the lead in high-profile diplomatic efforts in East Africa.

Awol says that while the Ethiopian leader pledged "non-interference" during a meeting last week with Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, the head of Sudan's ruling military council, his visit to Khartoum on Friday is a reaction to the African Union's suspension of Sudan from AU activities the day before.

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10:25 a.m.

The U.N. health agency says it's gravely concerned over the targeting of patients, medical staff and facilities in Sudan during a military crackdown on protesters that killed over 100 people this week.

The World Health Organization says security forces are making "incursions into Khartoum hospitals," forcing shutdowns of emergency and health services. Five patients and medical workers injured.

Friday's WHO statement says "these actions represent a total and unacceptable violation of international human rights law and must stop."

It says tent clinics set up to treat injured protesters have been set on fire and destroyed; medical equipment looted, and health care workers assaulted. Rapes of female health workers have also been reported.

The military launched a crackdown on Monday, dispersing the protest movement's main sit-in in the capital, Khartoum. A Sudanese medical group says 113 people have been killed in the crackdown.

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10:05 a.m.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is in Sudan to mediate between the ruling military and the country's protest leaders amid an army crackdown that has killed over 100 people this week.

Ahmed was met by Sudanese generals who in April ousted longtime autocrat Omar al-Bashir and took over the country.

He will hold talks separately later Friday with the Forces for the Declaration of Freedom and Change, a coalition of political groups demanding the military hand over power to civilian rule.

His visit comes after the African Union, based in Ethiopia, suspended Sudan on Thursday over the deadly crisis.

The military launched a crackdown on Monday, dispersing the protest movement's main sit-in in the capital, Khartoum.

A Sudanese medical group says 113 people have been killed in the crackdown.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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