Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Disorganization can cause anxiety and feelings of helplessness

Disorganization can cause anxiety and feelings of helplessness

{{featured_button_text}}

I could never figure out the solution for an organized house.

Like most moms, after a long day of work, picking up kids, grocery shopping and laundry, I was exhausted. I would look around at a house that was in shambles. Who would have thought that a family of four could create such a mess?

An article I found in Psychology Today validates that I am not alone. Moms everywhere feel the same frustration and live with disorganization.

Anxiety and depression have been linked to disorganization in homes and workplaces. And adding a catastrophic illness such as cancer can intensify the anxiety, especially when homes become unattended due to treatments, surgeries, a lack of a routine, and not feeling well.

I lived the nightmare and still can’t catch up to the months of not fully living in my home while coping with cancer. I threw things in places where I thought I someday would organize them.

Brandon Kutmas, a counselor with the Robert Young Center in Moline, said cancer, illness or a sudden change can create anxiety and depression. “After we experience a sudden negative change in our circumstances, every aspect of our life may seem like total chaos — as if our life will never be the same,” he said.

“Perhaps this is true. It really can be hard to let go of what was once a great thing. However, it is very unlikely that literally everything has changed. If you try hard enough, you might be able to see some constants in the storm. If not, you might be able to take solace in the fact that this new set of circumstances will also eventually pass.”

Mr. Kutmas said people with depression frequently struggle with finding the energy to keep up with life’s everyday demands, like showering, laundry, getting dressed, doing the dishes or going to work, which also makes depression worse.

“Depression is a serious illness that drains people of their motivation and often is paired with symptoms of anxiety, where people worry about their depression or they fear trying new things only to fail,” he said. “These symptoms are part of a vicious cycle that preserve the depression and anxiety while the person’s living situation deteriorates around them.”

Gilda’s Club of the Quad Cities will host a Cut the Clutter workshop for those affected by cancer from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 26, at 1234 E. River Drive, Davenport. People from Home Transitions Solutions Group, of Davenport, will offer tips to help attendees create clean, simple and organized spaces that are free of clutter.

The workshop also will identify ways to downsize and will focus on decision-making processes to create a safe and secure home while keeping anxiety down.

To get more information or to register, call Gilda’s Club at 563-326-7504 or email gc@gildasclubqc.org. Online registration is available at gildasclubqc.org/calendar.

For more information about Home Transitions Solutions Group, call 563-449-2855 or visit hometransitionsolutions.org.

Martha Garcia is a writer, communications instructor and bilingual marketing professional who lives in Bettendorf. She can be contacted at marthagarciawriter@yahoo.com.

Brandon Kutmas, a counselor with the Robert Young Center in Moline, said people with depression frequently struggle with finding the energy to keep up with life's everyday demands, like showering, laundry, getting dressed, doing the dishes or going to work, which also makes depression worse.

pull quote
0
1
0
0
0

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

Just the other day I was thinking I should pick up a new hobby to while away the hours in our new virus-riddled reality. Well, it didn't take long. I appear to have found that hobby. I just never thought it would be true crime cinematography.

COVID-19 lockdowns resulted in better air quality due to decreased commercial activity and automobile traffic. The lifting of lockdowns and a recent surge of wildfires in Western and Mountain states has quickly reversed this trend.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News