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Months after historic flooding shut down parts of Iowa’s third-largest city, a new ad campaign is encouraging Quad-Citians to visit downtown Davenport.

The campaign features a series of print ads and three videos, which will be broadcast on local television stations and on social media.

“Our goal is to show the variety of experiences downtown, and to bring more people down here,” said Alisha Espey, program director at the Downtown Davenport Partnership, which is spearheading the campaign.

The first video ad is family-themed. It follows Alvaro Macias, his wife and daughters enjoying a full slate of downtown attractions: the Freight House Farmers Market, the Figge Art Museum, virtual-reality games at Paradigm, a river-view dinner at The Diner, culminating in an evening of baseball and Ferris wheel-riding at Modern Woodmen Park during a Quad Cities River Bandits game.

“It was like taking a little vacation in our own backyard,” said Macias in an interview. He lives in Moline and works in Bettendorf, stopping in Davenport mostly for lunches and nightlife with his wife.

For Macias, the joy of the ad campaign was discovering all that downtown Davenport has to offer.

“I just needed to know what else was there,” he said. “It opened up my eyes.”

The ad campaign aims to open more eyes, especially as downtown rebounds from the longest, highest flood of the Mississippi River in Quad-Cities’ history.

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“It’s been a tough year for downtown businesses,” Espey said. “This is another display of how our community pulls together through tough times. We show our resiliency.”

The two forthcoming ads will focus on couples and young professionals, Espey said.

“Not all of the businesses were impacted directly by water,” she added. “But everyone was impacted in some way by the flood.”

Quad-City Times and OnMedia Advertising, a division of Mediacom, were partners in the project.

“We need to be constantly advocating for businesses in our community,” said Deb Anselm, publisher of the Quad-City Times. “This was an easy way for us to support businesses right here at home.”

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