Nebraska Cattlemen to meet in Kearney Dec. 4-6
AP

Nebraska Cattlemen to meet in Kearney Dec. 4-6

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The Nebraska Cattlemen annual convention and trade show is set for Dec. 4-6 at Younes Conference Center in Kearney.

The event starts with committee and council meetings and officer elections. The cow-calf council will host a banker panel on risk management. The farmer-stockman council will discuss cover crops and flood relief. The feedlot council will talk about the secure beef supply plan and get an update on research at the University of Nebraska from animal science professor Galen Erickson. The seedstock council will have an update from the Nebraska Cattlemen’s Classic and talk about bull nutrition and development in adverse conditions.

The general session begins at 5 p.m. with talks from president and vice president of the cattlemen’s association. The association will recognize retiring board members and give the Top Hand award, and the Young Cattlmen’s Class will graduate.

Stan Garbacz, interim director of global engagement at the University of Nebraska, will talk about the basics of international trade. Another talk will give a market outlook. That will come from Don Close, animal protein analyst for Rabo AgriFiance. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association vice president Jerry Bohn will be on hand for a national level update.

The evening includes a welcome reception, social and time at the trade show.

Thursday, Dec. 5, begins with committee meetings. The brand and property rights committee will talk about preserving property rights and review policy. The taxation committee will have a state legislative preview and discuss property tax relief.

The education and research committee will talk about post-secondary education. The marketing and commerce committee will discuss animal identification, traceability in product liability, rural broadband access and livestock dealer trust.

The Nebraska Cattlemen Foundation lunch will include updates from the foundation and honor donors and industry professionals.

Afternoon meetings include the animal health and nutrition committee with secure beef supply plan on the agenda. The natural resources and environment committee will have a regulatory update for medium sized operations, comparison of Nebraska’s water access rights to other states, and updates on state and federal issues.

The Nebraska Cattlewomen consumer promotion and education committee will discuss Beef in Schools and Ag Venture.

There will be a reception at 5 p.m. for the Nebraska Young Cattlemen’s Conference. The annual banquet starts at 7 p.m. with hall of fame and industry service awards.

Friday, Dec. 6 wraps up with a market talk during breakfast. Market reporting staff member Jeff Stolle will give a market update and outlook discussing cattle inventories, cattle on feed numbers and trends and expected price ranges for the coming year.

The annual business meeting begins at 9 a.m. Members will review six policy committee resolutions and set the direction for the association. They’ll also elect 2020 leadership.

Early registration for the convention ends Nov. 27 online at www.nebraskacattlemen.org. Full registration is $200 for members.

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