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Technical support article

Filtering out objectionable content



Many parents express concerns about the type of content that their children can view through the internet. Although Quad-Cities OnlineŽ does not offer any filtering software on our server, there are a variety of services and standards available on the WWW for filtering out objectionable content from a web browser. Keep in mind, however, that none of them are fail safe and the only sure solution is proper education of your children.

RSACi



The Recreational Software Advisory Council on the Internet has established a standard of ratings which web site authors may enable on their sites. These ratings are measured in four areas: sex, language, nudity, and violence.



If the web site you are viewing is rated with RSACi it contains a value from 0 to 4 measuring the severity of its content in those areas. In order to make use of these ratings you, the viewer, must enable your web browser's content advisory settings. In these settings you specify the severity of the content you will allow to be seen. If you go to a web site with ratings that are higher than your tolerance levels, it cannot be viewed without entering a password that you set.



Although this is one of the best filtering solutions available, there are a few caveats. At the time of this writing the only browser that contains the RSACi settings is Internet Explorer. Netscape has stated that its next major browser version will contain the filtering capability. Also, the filtering will only work properly if the author of the web site you are viewing has made the voluntary effort to rate his or her pages - which many have not.



The RSACi standard is growing in popularity, however, and most major web sites have already rated themselves with it. For more detailed information, as well as instructions on enabling filtering in your web browser, go to the RSACi home page at www.rsac.org.

Software packages



Some companies produce commercial software packages that run on your computer and attempt to block unwanted content from reaching the viewer. They accomplish this by various means such as scanning the text of a page for objectionable words or comparing the site's address to a database of black-listed locations.



None of these packages are foolproof to every situation, but some may find them a better alternative to the RSACi system mentioned above. The following is a short list of filtering programs available on the internet. You can find others by doing a search on subjects such as content filtering or child safety in your favorite search engine.





Local events heading








  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)