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Carl McClaskey always is on the move
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More photos from this shoot
Photo: Gary Krambeck/gkrambeck@qconline.com
Carl McClaskey is special projects director in the District of Rock Island.
More photos from this shoot
Photo: Gary Krambeck/gkrambeck@qconline.com
Carl McClaskey is special projects director in the District of Rock Island.
ROCK ISLAND — His mind races like a jackpot-spinning slot machine, and his memory and attention to detail are savant-like.

The words "satisfied" and "content" frighten the heck out of Carl McClaskey because no matter how good you were, yesterday is not today, and only today counts.

"What worked in the past, no matter how tried and true it might be, might not work today, and admiring something for any length of time only can lead to trouble," said Mr. McClaskey, who, after a star-studded event-planning career in Hollywood, returned to the Quad-Cities five years ago and became Renaissance Rock Island's special-events coordinator.

"When people ask what I do, and the 'story' begins, I'm always reminded of how and why I do this and how fortunate I am to have a career that is just part of my fabric," he said. "To me, it's what I do, and it's work. It's when I talk to others about my career and stuff that it hits me — I've got a pretty cool gig."

Mr. McClaskey works to strengthen and cultivate special events presented by The District. Throughout the year, the Alleman High School graduate leads District events such as Gallery Hop; Quad-Cities Criterium; Gumbo YaYa; Red, White & Boom; Ya Maka My Weekend; the Rock Island Grand Prix; and Fright Night.

He also moves barricades, works on corporate relationships, oversees large outdoor festivals, sets up and takes down fencing and picks up trash.

Mr. McClaskey is an idea-producing machine and secure enough in his own skin to know not every idea is a home run, although it never can be less than a triple.

He knows the world of entertainment and understands festivals can be fickle, that a summer thunderstorm along the Mississippi can affect profit and success. It does not, however, deter Mr. McClaskey from making every District event the best it can be.

"I'm amazed at what catches someone's eye when it comes to entertainment," he said. "The challenge is always figuring out what that is. I believe and I hope we have done that in my time here.

"You have to be an idea person but willing to listen to others and to those you seek to entertain. It's a juggle-fest of personalities and the unexpected, but the key is not to let the unexpected win."

The District in Rock Island is different from The Highlands Nightclub & Restaurant in Hollywood, Calif., a special-event venue and Wolfgang Puck-inspired restaurant in the Hollywood & Highland Entertainment Complex, home of The Kodak Theatre.

For years, Mr. McClaskey led the Hollywood party scene at The Highlands and guided events such as the cast and crew holiday party for "Frasier," "General Hospital's" 40th anniversary party, "Everybody Loves Raymond's" wrap party, and Usher's 21st birthday party.

He worked with ABC Television, the American Film Institute, Best Buy Media Achievers, Buena Vista International, Clear Channel Entertainment, ESPN, FOX Broadcasting, HBO, NBC, Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Universal Television, Wolfgang Puck and Wynn Las Vegas.

"There, I had a staff of over 100, and my job was to make sure everything the client needed, they got," Mr. McClaskey said. "It's a bit different here, but it's the same challenge and the same level of respect I have for what we produce and the many who help us here make it go."

Despite huge success on the West Coast, Mr. McClaskey said coming home was the right thing to do.

"I'm in L.A. prepping for my grandmother's 90th birthday," he said. "And my brother is out there raising his son, and then we lose my grandmother. I take step back and look around. I needed a change. I needed to come home and stay closer to my mother. This spot opened up, and I had a chance to see what The District is about and work on a plan."

Things in The District were not broken, but events were in need of some tweaking.

"I just kind of watched that first year, and we simply have built on strengths and turned weaknesses into strengths," Mr. McClaskey said. "I like what we have done."

He said the future is down the road. He loves what he does, but a time will come when he will again test life on the West Coast.

"Everything is great, but I have a hope someday to go back," he said. "Now, there is work to be done here, but that's something in the back of mind."







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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)