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Scott County keeping e-waste out of landfills
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Photo: Gary Krambeck
Blake White of Davenport, left and Andy Bartleson of Buffalo work at dismantling televisions and computer monitors at the Waste Commission of Scott County Electronic Demanufacturing Facility located at 5648 Carey Ave., Davenport.
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Photo: Gary Krambeck
Brian Briggs of Buffalo, facility manager at the demanufacturing facility, loads televisions and computer monitor tubes on a conveyor and into a grinder to convert into small pieces of glass. The Waste Commission of Scott County Electronic Demanufacturing Facility, located at 5648 Carey Ave., Davenport, breaks down electronic waste so the components can be recycled.
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Photo: Gary Krambeck
Employees of the Waste Commission of Scott County Electronic Demanufacturing Facility, located at 5648 Carey Ave., Davenport, break down electronic waste so the components can be recycled.
You name it and it can probably be recycled in the Quad-Cities.



Everything from antifreeze to computer screens can be recycled at The Waste Commission of Scott County's facilities in Davenport.



The Waste Commission operates several recycling programs for all Quad-Cities residents, one for household recyclables like paper, cardboard, aluminum cans, glass and plastic; one for e-waste and a program for recycling hazardous chemicals.



There also are recycling programs for household appliances, construction and demolition debris and automobile materials like batteries, oil filters and antifreeze at Scott Area Landfill.



"We serve Rock Island and Scott County residents, free of charge," Waste Commission education specialist Paula Mullin said.



Rock Island County customers must bring in proof of residency, like a recent utility bill. Scott County residents must only provide a valid address.



Anything containing a circuit board and/or cathode ray tube (CRT) is considered e-waste. This includes calculators, cameras, cell phones, computers, copy machines, scanners, televisions, video game equipment, VCRs and so much more.



The Waste Commission demanufactured 1.2 million tons of e-waste for recycling last year.



"Everything is demanufactured on-site. Nothing with retrievable data leaves this facility," Ms. Mullin explained. "We have staff that actually manually takes things apart and break it down into different components.



"They take out the wires, the circuit boards and the plastic and separate those. The components then get shipped off to facilities where they get recycled."



Many electronics contain hazardous chemicals that if thrown into landfills can be harmful. E-waste toxins include cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury and chromium in addition to the paints, foams and coatings used to manufacture the plastic used to build most electronics.



"E-waste contains all kinds of environmental hazards. If they are properly managed, we keep those things out of the environment," Ms. Mullins said.



Cowboys Reliable Recycling in Milan also recycles e-waste, as well as appliances.



"We tell people we will take anything with a cord, stuff you're not allowed to just throw away," owner Calvin Fisher said.



By recycling household hazardous materials, the Waste Commission also keeps those environmental dangers out of landfills.



Hazardous materials suitable for recycling include, adhesives, break fluid, bug spray, antifreeze, propane, pool chemicals, varnish, paint, cleansers, toner, fertilizer, pesticide, oil and many others.



Iowa state law makes it illegal to dispose of these materials in landfills, so at the Waste Commission, hazardous waste disposal is free. There is a slight fee for e-waste disposal, depending on the item. An appointment also is required for hazardous waste disposal.



"We lab pack (hazardous waste) into 55 gallon drums then ship them off to companies who either recycle the waste or dispose of it properly," Ms. Mullin said.



In the Iowa Quad-Cities only, bulky waste like furniture, tires and household appliances also can be recycled curbside as well as at the Waste Commission's facility.



Bulky waste is anything "too heavy to be lifted by one person or too large to fit in a garbage cart."



"You can put that on your curb in Bettendorf and Davenport and they will pick it up free of charge," Ms. Mullin said.



Cowboys doesn't accept household recyclables like cardboard, paper and plastic. It does accept aluminum cans, but does not buy them.

For More Info

Waste Commission of Scott County's Scott Area Recycling Center

Address: 5640 Carey Ave. in Davenport

Phone: (563) 386-9575

E-mail: mail@wastecom.com

Web site: www.wastecom.com



Cowboys Reliable Recycling

Address: 530 10th Ave. West in Milan

Phone: (309) 756-1014



Scott Area Landfill

Address: 11555 110th Ave. (County Road Y-48) in Davenport

Phone: (563) 381-1300

E-mail: mail@wastecom.com

Web site: www.wastecom.com




Local events heading








  Today is Thursday, Aug. 21, the 233rd day of 2014. There are 132 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Sheriff McLaughlin had the misfortune to dislocate his right shoulder some days ago when his carriage upset. He is now able to walk about but has a very sore shoulder.
1889 -- 125 years ago: A kindergarten was started in the downtown district of Rock Island with the Misses Dodie Hawes and Grace Knowlton as teachers.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Pope Pius X died in Rome.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Rock Island's new theater was named Esquire.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The J.I. Case Co. plant in Bettendorf will add from 150 to 200 employees by Jan. 1 a spokesman for the company said today. The Bettendorf Works today had a payroll of 1,350, but an increased production schedule will require additional people.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Illowa Council Boy Scouts of America reached and passed its campaign goal in a drive that began 14 months ago by raising more than $2.2 million for the expansion of Loud Thunder Reservation near Andalusia.






(More History)