Day in history for September 2, 2005

1855 -- 150 years ago
Michael Bartlett, Pleasant Valley, sold 2,600 watermelons during the season for an average of about 10 cents each. The melons were raised on 2 acres.

1880 -- 125 years ago
The Rock Island Board of Education elected as teachers Emily Freeman, Alice J. Lloyd and Jennie Kane.

1905 -- 100 years ago
Dr. G.A. Andreen, president of Augustana College, spoke at Chataqua, N.Y. His topic was ''Eastward.''

1930 -- 75 years ago
Incoming trains brought hundreds of persons of Belgian descent to the 3 day Belgian-American Festival at Moline and East Moline. Among those attending the celebration were Prince Albert de Ligne and his daughter, Princess Antoinette de Ligne, of Belgium.

1955 -- 50 years ago
Big time rodeo will make its bow in the Quad-City area tonight with a star-studded cast of cowboy contestants competing for $3,000 in prize money. All performances of the Labor Day weekend rodeo will be held at the Quad-City Speedway, south of Moline.

1980 -- 25 years ago
Thieves stole more than $8,000 worth of roofing equipment at Ridgewood Grade School, 3007 7th St., East Moline. The equipment is owned by DeVolder Brothers Roofing Contractors Inc., Moline.

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  Today is Tuesday, Sept, 30, the 273rd day of 2014. There are 92 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: The ARGUS Boys are very anxious to attend the great Democratic mass meeting tomorrow and we shall therefore, print no paper on the day.
1889 — 125 years ago: H.J. Lowery resigned from his position as manager at the Harper House.
1914 — 100 years ago: Curtis & Simonson was the name of a new legal partnership formed by two younger members of the Rock Island County Bar. Hugh Cyrtis and Devore Simonson..
1939 — 75 years ago: Harry Grell, deputy county clerk was named county recorder to fill the vacancy caused by a resignation.
1964 — 50 years ago: A new world wide reader insurance service program offering around the clock accident protection for Argus subscribers and their families is announced today.
1989 — 25 years ago: Tomato plant and other sensitive greenery may have had a hard time surviving overnight as temperatures neared the freezing point.




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