LOCAL FOOTBALL SCORING UPDATES PRESENTED BY THE HUNGRY HOBO:

Two candidates square off for Cleveland mayor


Share
Originally Posted Online: April 03, 2013, 11:10 pm
Last Updated: April 03, 2013, 11:21 pm
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
Related stories
By Lisa Hammer, correspondant@qconline.com

CLEVELAND -- As voters in this small town go to the polls April 9 to choose a mayor, they may be thinking of finances, uncashed trustee checks and full houses at board meetings, complete with police standing by.

Trustee Richard Waterman and treasurer Richard Lindell are competing for the right to succeed incumbent Jim White, who decided not to seek re-election.

Mr. Waterman said financial transparency is a big issue. He said the board hasn't seen the village checkbooks for four years.

He said trustees should not have to file a request under the Freedom of Information Act in order to see the checkbooks -- it should be automatic. He said Freedom of Information Act requests to the treasurer to see the checkbooks have been unsuccessful.

"I'm not saying there's anything wrong with village funds, but why is he so secretive about them?" he said.

Mr. Lindell said he's given regular financial reports to the board. According to him, Trustee Sherri Krogman is the chief person asking to see the village's checkbook and said she shows him "absolutely no respect at all," just to make "a big splash."

"I can't meet with her by myself; it's impossible. She's done so many mean things to me. I work at John Deere -- she knows I make a lot more money than the little village of Cleveland makes in three years," he said.

He added that asking for the checkbook is akin to accusing him of doing something wrong.

He said the town will know more after he responds at a meeting tonight (April 4) to a recent Dispatch editorial saying he should turn over the checkbook to village officials who want to see it.

Trustee pay has also been an issue, with some trustees going unpaid because they haven't filled out W-4 forms annually, which Mr. Lindell said are required by the Internal Revenue Service each year. According to Mr. Lindell, the government told him they would fine the town if they didn't check the forms each year.

A spokesman for the IRS said a certified public accountant or tax attorney would be better able to answer those questions.

The unpaid trustees are owed a total of $2,000, and the money has been turned over to the Illinois treasurer's office, Mr. Lindell said. Trustees have been instructed how to collect it, according to Mr. Lindell, although he said they apparently haven't done so because the money is outstanding.

Mr. Waterman said it's wrong to turn over checks to the state as unclaimed money. He and the other trustees continue to question having to submit W-4 forms annually.

"I bet you don't know anybody anywhere in the United States that fills one out every year," he said.

Mr. Lindell said instead of paying police, the village should be taking care of services such as hazard mitigation. He said the town had a plan, but it's fallen by the wayside and it would be wrong to call police or the Barstow fire department in the event of a storm or flood.

"We actually have no plan, it's just call the police and hope somebody comes in and saves the day," he said. "I think I can turn this thing around, but (Trustee Krogman) has to come to meetings with a different objective."

Mr. Waterman said he would have to research the status of the town's hazard mitigation plan before commenting.

Mr. Lindell cites his training in group problem solving at Deere as one of his qualifications for the job of running Cleveland.




Related Stories
















 



Local events heading








  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)