Kitchen tip: Peppercorns 101


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Posted Online: March 19, 2013, 9:38 am
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Sure, it's a common table spice now, but did you know pepper was once extremely expensive? It was of the most valued items during the time of the spice trade.

Peppercorns come in a variety of colors, and each spices and flavors food in its own way:

Black peppercorns (Piper nigrum) are the most common type of peppercorn. The spice actually is a dried berry. The berries are picked when they are just turning red but still underripe, then dried until the skin shrivels and darkens.

White peppercorns come from the same species, P. nigrum, but the berry is ripened and the skin removed before drying. It often is used in place of black pepper in light-colored foods and sauces so it won't be visually noticed but still can lend some pungency.

Green peppercorns also come from the same soft, underripe P. nigrum. They are preserved through artificial drying or in water, vinegar or brine. Green peppercorns tend to lend a fresh, green flavor as well as some pungency. If the peppercorns are preserved just as they begin to turn red, they may be called "red pepper," though these are not the same as pink peppercorns.

Pink (or red) peppercorns actually are fruits from a different tree (Schinus terebinthifolius). Generally sweeter and more aromatic than p. nigrum, the peppercorns are often used as a decoration or garnish on a plated dish.

Peppercorns can be found whole, cracked, ground and powdered. For the freshest and most intense flavor, buy peppercorns whole and grind right before using.

















 



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  Today is Tuesday, July 22, the 203rd day of 2014. There are 162 days left in the year.

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1889 -- 125 years ago: The mayor and bridge committee let a contract to the Clinton Bridge company for a $1,125 iron bridge across Sears canal near Milan.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Injunction proceedings to compel the Central Association to keep a baseball team in Rock Island for the remainder of the season were contemplated by some of the Rock Island fans, but they decided to defer action.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The first of the new and more powerful diesel engines built for the Rock Island Lines for the proposed Chicago-Denver run, passed thru the Tri-Cities this morning.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Rock Island Rescue Mission is negotiating for the purchase of the Prince Hall Masonic Home located at 37th Avenue and 5th Street, Rock Island.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Quad Cities Container Terminal is being lauded as a giant business boon that will save several days and hundreds of dollars on each goods shipment to the coasts. The Quad Cities Container Terminal is the final piece of the puzzle that opens up increase access to world markets, Robert Goldstein said.








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