Carl Gehrmann


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Posted Online: March 06, 2013, 7:16 pm
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Memorial services to celebrate the life of Carl Harry Gehrmann, 82, a resident of Bettendorf, formerly of Davenport, will be 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 27, at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Davenport. Keeping with Carl's wishes, cremation rites were accorded, and internment will take place at Oakdale Cemetery. The family will greet friends in the Great Hall at church from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. prior to the service time.
Carl passed away Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at the Iowa Masonic Home, Bettendorf, following an extended illness.
Carl Harry Gehrmann was born Dec. 7, 1930, in Davenport, the son of John Henry and Edna Hanssen Gehrmann. He served proudly in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps during the Korean War. Carl was united in marriage to Mary Lee Davis on July 10, 1954, at Grace Church in Sheboygan, Wis.
Carl was a 1948 graduate of Davenport High School. He furthered his education at the University of Wisconsin, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering in 1953. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and Pi Tau Sigma engineering fraternity at the university. Carl was president of Kohrs Cold Storage. Following a long and successful career, he retired in 1992.
He volunteered for many years with the Boy Scouts of America as president of the Buffalo Bill Council, receiving the Silver Beaver Award. He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Davenport Rotary, Davenport Outing Club, Rock Island Arsenal Golf Club, National Exchange Club, Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks and the Iowa Quarterback Club. He served as president of the International Association of Refrigerated Warehouses. He enjoyed bowling on the Outing Club Monday Night Bowling League and was an avid golfer. Carl also enjoyed the outdoors, canoeing with his family and friends on Memorial Day weekend.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Boy Scouts of America or the Iowa Masonic Home.
In addition to his loving wife, Mary Lee, he is survived by their four sons and daughters-in-law, Phillip and Carol, Bettendorf, Frederick and Jill, Springfield, Ill., Conrad and Jody, Seattle, Wash., and Charles and Georgia, Madison, Wis.; six grandchildren, Janet, Courtney, Hans, Catherine, Elizabeth and Mary Therese; and his brother, William Gehrmann, Burlington, Iowa.
He was preceded in death by his parents; and a sister-in-law, Kay Gehrmann. May they rest in peace.
The family would like to thank Dr. Kevin Blechle along with the compassionate, caring staff in all departments at the Iowa Masonic Health Facilities for the excellent care.
Online remembrances and condolences may be expressed to the family by visiting Carl's obituary at hmdfuneralhome.com.














 




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  Today is Tuesday, Sept. 16, the 259th day of 2014. There are 106 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: A fine lumber mill is on the course of erection at Andalusia. A flouring mill at that location is doing a fine business.
1889 — 125 years ago: J.B. Lidders, past captain of Beardsley Camp, Sons of Veterans, returned from Paterson, N.Y., where he attended the National Sons of Veterans encampments.
1914 — 100 years ago: President Wilson announced that he had received from the imperial chancellor of Germany a noncommittal reply to his inquiry into a report that the emperor was willing to discuss terms of peace.
1939 — 75 years ago: Delegates at the Illinois Conference of the Methodist Church in Springfield voted to raise the minimum pay of ministers so that every pastor would get at least $1,000 annually.
1964 — 50 years ago: An audience of more than 2,600 persons jammed into the Davenport RKO Orpheum theater with a shoe horn feasted on a Miller-Diller evening that was a killer night. Phyllis Diller sent the audience with her offbeat humor. And send them she did! It was Miss Diller's third appearance in the Quad-Cities area.
1989 — 25 years ago: A few years ago, a vacant lot on 7th Avenue and 14th Street in Rock Island was a community nuisance. Weeds grew as high 18 inches. Today, the lot has a new face, thanks to Michael and Sheila Rind and other neighbors who helped them turn it into a park three weeks ago.





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