Ice in decline: Researcher probes causes of arctic ice melt


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Posted Online: Feb. 19, 2013, 3:19 pm
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By Sarah J. Gardner, sjgardner@qconline.com
You could say Dr. Jason Box began his research on glaciers at an early age. While growing up in Colorado, he says, his first report in elementary school was on glaciers. To write it, he used the Encyclopedia Britannica. These days, the Nobel laureate takes a more hands-on approach to his research, having logged 19 trips to Greenland since 1994 and spent more than a year camping on the ice sheet.

Box appeared at Augustana College in Rock Island last month to deliver a talk ahead of the screening of "Chasing Ice," a film that will be shown at the college on March 23 as part of the annual Environmental Film Festival put together by the Eagle View Group of the Sierra Club. Box was a key contributor to the Greenland portion of the film, which uses time-lapse videos to capture the decline of glaciers over the course of several years. A trailer for the film can be seen at chasingice.com.

"I've seen audiences react to the film, and I know it's connecting with people in ways that pure science doesn't connect, because it has art and it has communication," says Box. "That's valuable, because of the urgency of climate change."

Part of that urgency is spurred by realization among scientists that the effects of climate change are taking place faster than previously predicted. Greenland is a good example of this, says Box, because the "models don't predict the extent of melting that we've observed in recent years." In the summer of 2012, for example, NASA satellites showed virtually the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet was melting to the astonishment of many observers.

"Climate models often surprise us in how conservative they are," says Box, who explains this is because all the different factors have not yet been articulated by scientists or then encoded as mathematical formulas in the models. "It takes a long time to develop that code."

Currently, Box is embarking upon a research project he hopes will identify one of these as-yet unaccounted factors. As climate change causes an increase in wildfires such as those seen in Colorado last summer, could the soot they produce be settling on the Greenland ice sheet and causing it to melt at an accelerated rate?

He describes the expedition as an "experiment in citizen science crowd funding" because, rather than relying on a grant from a science foundation, the project has set up a website (DarkSnowProject.org) that seeks funding from ordinary citizens. It is the first major scientific research project to use social media and Internet crowd funding to cover its costs.

"Supporters are part of the expedition," says Box. "We communicate back to them our progress and findings, and so they can feel some ownership of the project." It's a good way for those who see the film "Chasing Ice" and want to help further Arctic research to do so, he says.

Ultimately, the effects of climate change that we are observing merit our response, says Box. There is no one silver bullet to reverse current trends, he explains, but there are a number of things we can do that add up to "silver buckshot." "We can take the edge off of it for sure," he says. "We want to because we're flirting with carbon catastrophe. For the sake of our kids we have no choice but to start taking this more seriously."

Sarah J. Gardner is the editor of Radish magazine.

8th Annual Environmental Film Fest

The 2013 Environmental Film Festival will take place from 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. March 23 in Olin Auditorium at Augustana College, 639 38th St, Rock Island. As in years past, the event will be free and open to the public, and healthy snacks will be served between films. "We don't want anybody to leave because they are hungry. There's no need!" says Kathryn Allen, one of the event organizers.

In addition to "Chasing Ice," two other full-length feature films will be screened at the event. "Last Call at the Oasis," a film about the growing water crisis, and "The Clean Bridge Project," a documentary that follows the adventures of one couple who commit to generating no waste for one year.

For more information on the event, visit augustana.edu/x12049.xml.

In Iowa City? See 'Chasing Ice' at the Landlocked Film Festival

Now in it's sixth year, the Landlocked Film Festival presents independent movies from around the world to audiences gathered in Iowa City's historic downtown. This year the lineup of films includes "Chasing Ice," being screened at The University of Iowa Bijou Cinema, 166-B Iowa Memorial Union, March 8-14. For showtimes, visit bijou.uiowa.edu. For more information on the Landlocked Film Festival, visit landlockedfilmfestival.org.

















 



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  Today is Saturday, April 19, the 109th day of 2014. There are 256 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Miss McCorkindale has opened millinery rooms over Gimbel's dry goods store, where she offers a choice lot of millinery goods, which she will manufacture to order.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The little South Park Presbyterian chapel celebrated it first Easter decorated with flowers for an afternoon worship service attended by a large congregation.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Wennerberg Chorus of Augustana College has returned from a 2,000-mile tour in the Eastern states and Illinois.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Col. Charles Lindbergh has stated that he is convinced that Germany's air force is equal to the combined sky fleets of her potential European foes.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Small gas motors may be permitted on boats in the lake to be built in Loud Thunder Forest Preserve. The prospect was discussed yesterday at a meeting of the Rock Island County Forest Preserve Commission.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The annual Dispatch/Rock Island Argus Spelling Bee continues to be a family tradition. Ed Lee, an eighth-grader at John Deere Junior High School, Moline, is the 1989 spelling bee champion from among 49 top spellers in Rock Island, Henry and Mercer counties. He advances to the competition in Washington, D.C. Runnerup was Ed's sister, Susan.






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