Kay Gottman


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Posted Online: Feb. 16, 2013, 9:40 pm
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Kay D. Gottman, 73, passed away on February 14, 2013, in Jacksonville Beach, Fla.
A memorial service will be at 11 a.m., Monday, Feb. 18, at the Chapel of Quinn-Shalz Funeral Home, Jacksonville Beach. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Kay's name to Nemours Children's Hospital, 807 Childrens Way Jacksonville, FL 32207.
She was born on Oct. 29, 1939, in Davenport, and resided in the Quad-Cities area until moving to Florida in 1985. Kay was employed by Nemours Children's Hospital for 17 years.
Survivors include her stepson, Michael Gottman (Cindy); daughter, Kimberly Gottman (Kim) and Kelly Monson (Scott); grandchildren, Samantha Monson, Nicole Monson and Kayla Rennison (Brandon); and great-grandchildren, Kaden and Kooper Rennison. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of 47 years, William Gottman.
Please visit our online tribute at www.quinn-shalz.com. Services are under the care and direction of Quinn-shalz, A Family Funeral Home, Jacksonville Beach.
















 



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