Woodhull approves video gaming with little opposition


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Posted Online: Feb. 13, 2013, 8:57 pm
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By Sherrie Taylor, rnstytlr@winco.net
WOODHULL -- The village board approved video gaming on Monday night.

The approval came after a survey of residents. Of the 238 responses to the survey, only 19 residents expressed a strong opposition to video gaming.

Businesses now must be approved by the state and will be required to pay the village a yearly fee of $25 per machine, with a maximum of five machines per business, Mayor Dave Holmes said, adding it may take a while for businesses to get state approval because of a backlog of applicants.

"Video gaming will not have as negative an effect to the village or police protection as alcohol does," Police Chief Clayton Brendal told the board.

The End Zone and two other businesses have expressed an interest in offering video gaming, the mayor said.

The board also discussed raising water and sewer rates to cover the cost of future work on the sewer system.

Although the village has applied for a grant to help fund the work, a rate hike also is needed, Mayor Holmes said, adding there has been one rate increase in the past 17 years, and it yielded about 15 percent additional income for the water-sewer fund.

The board is expected to consider a rate hike at its March meeting.

The board also approved installing two street lights on Lake Drive for $6,354, with the Lakeside developer covering half the cost.




















 




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  Today is Tuesday, Sept 2, the 245th day of 2014. There are 120 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: It is estimated that 300,000 people attended the recent Democratic convention in Chicago when Gen. George B. McClellan of New Jersey was nominated as a candidate for president of the United States.
1889 — 125 years ago: Alderman Frank Ill, Winslow Howard and Captain J.M. Montgomery returned from Milwaukee, where they attended the national Grand Army of the Republic encampment.
1914 — 100 years ago: Three members of the Rock Island YMCA accepted positions as physical directors of other associations. Albert Cook went to Kewanee, C.D. Curtis to Canton and Willis Woods to Leavenworth, Kan.
1939 — 75 years ago: Former President Herbert Hoover appealed for national support of President F.D. Roosevelt and Congress in every effort to keep the United States out of war.
1964 — 50 years ago: The Rock Island Junior chamber pf Commerce has received answers to about 65 % of the 600 questionnaires mailed out recently in a "Community Attitude Survey" to analyze sentiments of citizens towards their city's various recreational, educational, and civic service programs.
1989 — 25 years ago: The two thunderstorms passing through the Quad Cities last night and early today left some area residents reaching for their flashlights.






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