Letter: Well-armed citizenry doesn’t serve same purpose as militia


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Posted Online: Feb. 08, 2013, 2:40 pm
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As a professional soldier and historian I have a few insights on firearms and the Second Amendment in response to the Feb. 4 letter, "Keep in mind the real history of the 2nd Amendment."

The writer states the weapons of the military and colonists were the same, implying that is the basis of the well-regulated militia. No they were not.
Many colonial families owned antiquated hunting weapons from the early 1700s and 1600s.

Armories were stocked with the standard British military musket of the period.

Weapons uniformity is necessary in units so the commanders train troops to the same standard, and know the range and volume of fire his unit can produce.

A unit will not be trained to standard if everyone brings a different weapon.
Several armories in many colonies had standard British weapons stored by the colonial government.

The one in Williamsburg, Va., is an example of this and is still in existence. Typically, when the militia was called for training, members did not bring their own personal weapons.

Lexington and Concord were also armories.

The 3,000 farmers who came from all the towns around to chase the British back to Boston did not have time to draw a weapon.

Most were not in the militia, and they brought a wide variety of personal weapons for that fight.

Shay's Rebellion was the same -- the farmer insurgents or Regulators brought their own non-standard weapons.

The clauses about well-regulated militia and the right to bear arms serve two distinct different purposes.

Harold Knudsen,
Moline

















 



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  Today is Thursday, July 31, the 212th day of 2014. There are 153 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: A corps of surgeons now occupies the new hospital quarters at the Garrison Hospital on the Rock Island Arsenal. A fence has been installed to enclose the prison hospital.
1889 -- 125 years ago: B. Winter has let a contract to Christ Schreiner for a two story brick building with a double store front on the south side of 3rd Avenue just west of 17th Street. The estimated cost was $4,500.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Germany sent simultaneous ultimatums to Russia and France, demanding that Russia suspend mobilization within 12 hours and demanding that France inform Germany within 18 hours. In the case of war between Germany and Russia, France would remain neutral.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Civil service offices at the post office and the Rock Island Arsenal were swamped as more than 700 youths sought 15 machinist apprenticeships at the Arsenal.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Last night, American Legion Post 246 in Moline figuratively handed over the trousers to a female ex-Marine and petticoat rule began. Olga Swanson, of Moline, was installed as the first woman commander of the post .
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Illinois Quad City Civic Center captured the excitement and interest of a convention of auditorium managers this weekend in Reno, Nev. Bill Adams, civic center authority chairman, said the 10,000-seat arena planned for downtown Moline has caught the eye of construction firms, suppliers, management teams and concession groups.








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