Moline (16-10, 3-4 WB6) at Quincy (15-6, 6-1 WB6)


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Posted Online: Feb. 07, 2013, 5:50 pm
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By Marc Nesseler, nesseler@qconline.com
Tonight: The Moline Maroons, 2-2 on the road in the Western Big 6 Conference, travel to Quincy, which is looking to finish conference play undefeated at home, with the tipoff at 7:30, following the sophomore game at 6.

Saturday: Moline does not play. Quincy hosts Jacksonville.

On Twitter: Follow @SchuckDaddy for tonight's game.

Probable lineups:
Moline:
G: Tyler Biscontine, 5-10, So. (10.4 ppg, 1.6 rpg), Drew Owens, 6-0, Sr. (8.8, 3.7) & Jed Wood, 6-0, Sr. (10.0, 2.5); F: Derrick Stabler, 6-4, Sr. (5.8, 3.1); C: Brandon Vice, 6-6, Jr. (10.1, 7.2).

Quincy: G: Martin Kvitle, 6-3, Sr. (16.3 ppg, 4.1 rpg), Mason Fairley, 5-11, Sr. (6.4, 4.0), Cole Abbey, 6-0, Sr. (12.5, 3.0) & Zach Burry, 6-1, Jr. (3.7, 0.9); C: Jason Salrin, 6-7, Sr. (5.9, 8.0).

Why watch: The Blue Devils are trying to maintain their grip on their WB6 lead, up by a game over Galesburg and Rock Island. A loss would leave them in a tie for the top spot with the winner of that one. If Quincy wins, it will match the 5-0 home league mark last achieved by Quincy in 2007-08. … Quincy won the first time around, 48-32 at Wharton Field House. That was in the midst of Moline's five-game losing streak. Outside of that stretch, Moline is 16-5. Since then, Moline has added Biscontine at the point and fellow sophomore Mitch Reeves as a top reserve. "When we played Quincy earlier in the season, we were a team still searching for an identity," said Moline coach Jeff Schimmel. "Players were still trying to find their roles." … Conversely, Quincy is different as well, not so much in personnel but in direction. The Devils have lost four of their last seven games. They have been outrebounded in three and were square in the other. Coincidentally, each one of those teams had a starter at least 6-6 to battle Quincy down low. That means the Devils will place a premium on battling Vice in the paint, with Stabler's improved play down low also a concern. … In that first game, Cole Abbey struck for 25 points, nearly as much as Moline scored (32). "We need to value every possession," said Schimmel. "And, with Abbey scoring 25 the first time, we need to know where he is on the floor." … Moline hasn't been below 40 points since scoring 39 against Bettendorf in the Genesis Shootout on Dec. 15, the day after the loss to Quincy.

Moline coach Jeff Schimmel: "Most of our guys have never been on the floor for a varsity game at Quincy, so we need to get over the nerves and pregame hype early. We know we are a huge underdog against the conference leader, so hopefully we can play with the 'nothing to lose' mentality and compete."

















 



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  Today is Wednesday, April 23, the 113th day of 2014. There are 252 days left in the year.

1864 — 150 years ago: Some persons are negotiating for 80 feet of ground on Illinois Street with a view of erecting four stores thereon. It would serve a better purpose if the money was invested in neat tenement houses.
1889 — 125 years ago: The Central station, car house and stables of the Moline-Rock Island Horse Railway line of the Holmes syndicate, together with 15 cars and 42 head of horses, were destroyed by fire. The loss was at $15,000.
1914 — 100 years ago: Vera Cruz, Mexico, after a day and night of resistance to American forces, gradually ceased opposition. The American forces took complete control of the city.
1939 — 75 years ago: Dr. R. Bruce Collins was reelected for a second term as president of the Lower Rock Island County Tuberculosis Association.
1964 — 50 years ago: Work is scheduled to begin this summer on construction of a new men's residence complex and an addition to the dining facilities at Westerlin Hall at Augustana College.
1989 — 25 years ago: Special Olympics competitors were triple winners at Rock Island High School Saturday. The participants vanquished the rain that fell during the competition, and some won their events; but most important, they triumphed over their own disabilities.




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