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View from QCA: Defense cuts risk nation's security, RIA


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Posted Online: Jan. 30, 2013, 1:29 pm
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By Kerry Skinner
It is important for members of Congress to know that they are risking our national security by failing to address, in a timely manner, the fiscal needs of our defense forces.

Recently, the Army's Chief of Staff, Gen. Ray Odierno, spoke at the Association of the United States Army's (AUSA) January Institute of Land Warfare breakfast in Washington, DC, and his message was quite clear -- our national security is at risk because of the fiscal uncertainty that we face today.

The numbers are sobering -- a $6 billion shortfall for FY13 in Army operation and maintenance accounts because Congress has failed to pass appropriations legislation and the Army must spend at the Fiscal Year 2012 budget levels.

If sequestration triggers on March 1, another $6 billion shortfall will occur.
Combined with other underfunding, the total shortfall for FY13 could be $17 billion -- in wartime!

Gen. Odierno outlined the steps the Army is taking to remain effective while dealing with the lack of funding -- cancelling combat training center rotations, delaying depot work, cancelation of maintenance for vehicles that are not bound immediately for the current fight, freezing civilian hiring, potential furloughing of existing employees and laying off temporary workers.

The bottom line is that training and therefore readiness will suffer. He described Army end strength reductions to 490,000 that will occur regardless and said that if sequestration triggers, the number of troops could further dip.

Gen. Odierno stressed that what the Army needs most is some budget predictability through several years so that end strength and modernization and readiness can be carefully balanced and a hollow force avoided.
AUSA has been urging Congress to solve the sequestration puzzle quickly and we continue to highlight the significant dangers posed by sequestration and the repeated use of continuing resolutions to fund the Department of Defense.

Unfortunately the military-related headlines in major newspapers today focus on side issues that serve only to take the eyes of the American people off of the key issue -- the fiscal process must be put back in order so that our defense forces can maintain their readiness and their ability to defend this nation.
Kerry Skinner is president of the Rock Island Arsenal Chapter of the Association of the United States Army; info@ria-ausa.org.


















 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

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1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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