Don't be a dope, lying rarely works


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Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2013, 2:53 pm
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By Loretta LaRoche
Several years ago I watched a very interesting film called "The Invention of Lying." It is based on the premise that no one can lie about anything.

As a result, individuals say whatever they're thinking about anyone or anything, no matter the circumstances. In one scene, two people are on a first date and the suitor asks the woman if she'll go out with him again. Her reply: " Oh, no, I like you, but I can't go out with you again. You're too fat! I need to have a relationship with a handsome, athletic type so my children will look good."

Now, I've been on some dates in my lifetime, and there must've been moments when I had some insensitive thoughts, but I didn't relay them to my date. I'm sure they might have had some insensitive thoughts, too. Thank God they kept their mouths shut.

In the movie, one of the characters discovers lying when a bank clerk gives him too much money when he cashes a check.

Most of us have been given some rules concerning lying by our families or various authority figures.

We've been told that it doesn't serve us to lie, because if we're found out, there could be grave consequences. And we've been told that lying does not build character or help with self-worth.

My school years were spent in Catholic school, and if you were caught lying there was hell to pay. Then your parents were informed and you went through more hell.

There have been many debates about little white lies versus big, fat ones. Sometimes we just don't want to hurt someone's feelings, so we adjust the truth a little. However, it seems that big, fat, juicy lies are becoming more and more a part of this culture.

It's particularly rampant in the sports arena. I have been keeping up with the ongoing stories about Lance Armstrong. He is someone I did several conferences with in Canada.

I listened to his speeches on how he overcame childhood difficulties and cancer, and I was awed by his courage and tenacity. I had my picture taken with him and brought home an autographed picture for my grandson. I even had lunch with his mother.

When I started to read the stories about his doping, I thought, "What a dope!''

As the situation unraveled more and more, his sponsors withdrew and his titles were taken away. Somehow or other Armstrong will survive; he's proven that he's a survivor. My concern is for the people who believed in him.

Maybe the lesson learned will be that you never really get away with anything, because even if you're never found out, one person will know for sure, and that person is you.

















 



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  Today is Tuesday, July 22, the 203rd day of 2014. There are 162 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Everybody is invited to go on a moonlight excursion next Monday evening on the steamer New Boston. The trip will be from Davenport to Muscatine and back.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The mayor and bridge committee let a contract to the Clinton Bridge company for a $1,125 iron bridge across Sears canal near Milan.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Injunction proceedings to compel the Central Association to keep a baseball team in Rock Island for the remainder of the season were contemplated by some of the Rock Island fans, but they decided to defer action.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The first of the new and more powerful diesel engines built for the Rock Island Lines for the proposed Chicago-Denver run, passed thru the Tri-Cities this morning.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Rock Island Rescue Mission is negotiating for the purchase of the Prince Hall Masonic Home located at 37th Avenue and 5th Street, Rock Island.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Quad Cities Container Terminal is being lauded as a giant business boon that will save several days and hundreds of dollars on each goods shipment to the coasts. The Quad Cities Container Terminal is the final piece of the puzzle that opens up increase access to world markets, Robert Goldstein said.








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