Don't be a dope, lying rarely works


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Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2013, 2:53 pm
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By Loretta LaRoche
Several years ago I watched a very interesting film called "The Invention of Lying." It is based on the premise that no one can lie about anything.

As a result, individuals say whatever they're thinking about anyone or anything, no matter the circumstances. In one scene, two people are on a first date and the suitor asks the woman if she'll go out with him again. Her reply: " Oh, no, I like you, but I can't go out with you again. You're too fat! I need to have a relationship with a handsome, athletic type so my children will look good."

Now, I've been on some dates in my lifetime, and there must've been moments when I had some insensitive thoughts, but I didn't relay them to my date. I'm sure they might have had some insensitive thoughts, too. Thank God they kept their mouths shut.

In the movie, one of the characters discovers lying when a bank clerk gives him too much money when he cashes a check.

Most of us have been given some rules concerning lying by our families or various authority figures.

We've been told that it doesn't serve us to lie, because if we're found out, there could be grave consequences. And we've been told that lying does not build character or help with self-worth.

My school years were spent in Catholic school, and if you were caught lying there was hell to pay. Then your parents were informed and you went through more hell.

There have been many debates about little white lies versus big, fat ones. Sometimes we just don't want to hurt someone's feelings, so we adjust the truth a little. However, it seems that big, fat, juicy lies are becoming more and more a part of this culture.

It's particularly rampant in the sports arena. I have been keeping up with the ongoing stories about Lance Armstrong. He is someone I did several conferences with in Canada.

I listened to his speeches on how he overcame childhood difficulties and cancer, and I was awed by his courage and tenacity. I had my picture taken with him and brought home an autographed picture for my grandson. I even had lunch with his mother.

When I started to read the stories about his doping, I thought, "What a dope!''

As the situation unraveled more and more, his sponsors withdrew and his titles were taken away. Somehow or other Armstrong will survive; he's proven that he's a survivor. My concern is for the people who believed in him.

Maybe the lesson learned will be that you never really get away with anything, because even if you're never found out, one person will know for sure, and that person is you.

















 



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  Today is Thursday, July 31, the 212th day of 2014. There are 153 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: A corps of surgeons now occupies the new hospital quarters at the Garrison Hospital on the Rock Island Arsenal. A fence has been installed to enclose the prison hospital.
1889 -- 125 years ago: B. Winter has let a contract to Christ Schreiner for a two story brick building with a double store front on the south side of 3rd Avenue just west of 17th Street. The estimated cost was $4,500.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Germany sent simultaneous ultimatums to Russia and France, demanding that Russia suspend mobilization within 12 hours and demanding that France inform Germany within 18 hours. In the case of war between Germany and Russia, France would remain neutral.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Civil service offices at the post office and the Rock Island Arsenal were swamped as more than 700 youths sought 15 machinist apprenticeships at the Arsenal.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Last night, American Legion Post 246 in Moline figuratively handed over the trousers to a female ex-Marine and petticoat rule began. Olga Swanson, of Moline, was installed as the first woman commander of the post .
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Illinois Quad City Civic Center captured the excitement and interest of a convention of auditorium managers this weekend in Reno, Nev. Bill Adams, civic center authority chairman, said the 10,000-seat arena planned for downtown Moline has caught the eye of construction firms, suppliers, management teams and concession groups.








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