Miss Rodeo seeks to lasso support in fundraiser


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Posted Online: Jan. 11, 2013, 9:05 pm
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By Pam Berenger, pberenger@qconline.com
Boots or heels? Cassandra Spivey is comfortable in both.

Last month, the 22-year-old Sherrard woman was named Miss Rodeo Illinois and will go to Las Vegas in December to compete for the title of Miss Rodeo America during the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association's national finals rodeo at the MGM.

Her coronation as Miss Rodeo Illinois, and a fundraiser to help her get to Las Vegas, will be held from4 to 11 tonight at the Reynolds American Legion, 501 Main St.

There will be a spaghetti dinner, live and silent auctions, kids games and line dance lessons. Her coronation will be at 7 p.m. The cost is $20 at the door for the meal and dance, or $10 for the dance only.

Like any pageant, it will be broken into categories, including modeling, written tests and interviews. She'll be slipping on heels to go with formal handmade leather dresses she'll wear during the interviews and modeling portions of the contest.

But for the riding competition, boots will be the footwear of choice.Miss Spivey and the 31 other contestants will draw the name of the horse they will ride to show their horsemanship skills.

"These horses are not trained pleasure horses by any means," she said. "You never know what kind of horse you're going to get. I'll be spending a lot of time with other people's horses this year to prepare for that."

Miss Spivey has a lot of experience under her silver belt buckle already. It started when she was in third-grade, and her parents, Cheryle and Jerry Spivey, allowed her to take her pleasure pony into a barrel race.

"The children's class was over so I had to run against the adults," she said. "I placed, and I fell in love with speed events."

Ms. Spivey's past achievements include having the fastest horse in Mercer and Henry counties and having the 4-H high point speed horse from 2001-09, FFA grand champion all-around horse, champion speed horse, western pleasure horse, English pleasure horse and reserve halter horse and the 2011 barrel racing champion of the Kinsey Rodeo summer series.

She did all that while jockeying school, basketball, track, marching drill team, cross country, volleyball and choir.

She was 2007 Miss Muscatine County Saddle Club, 2007 Miss Henry County Equestrian Ambassador and 2009 Miss New Windsor Fair and Rodeo.

"I love rodeo," she said. "It's a family sport, a part of our heritage and culture. One of my goals is to bring a PRCA (Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association) rodeo back to Illinois."

Miss Rodeo America travels the country spreading the word about rodeo and horsemanship.

Ms. Spivey said it will cost her about $20,000 to get to the competition. Tonight's fundraiser will help offset the cost.

For more information, visit missrodeoillinois.com.

















 




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  Today is Monday, Sept. 1, the 244th day of 2014. There are 121 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: We are informed by J.H. Hull that the reason the street sprinkler was not at work yesterday settling the dust on the streets, was because one of his horses was injured.
1889 -- 125 years ago: Bonnie McGregor, a fleet-footed stallion owned by S.W. Wheelock of this community, covered himself with glory at Lexington, Ky, when he ran a mile in 2:13 1/2. The horse's value was estimated as at least $50,000.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Troops are pouring into Paris to prepare for defense of the city. The German army is reported to be only 60 miles from the capital of France.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The German army has invaded Poland in undeclared warfare. Poland has appealed to Great Britain and France for aid.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Publication of a plant newspaper, the Farmall Works News, has been launched at the Rock Island IHC factory and replaces a managerial newsletter.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Officials predict Monday's Rock Island Labor Parade will be the biggest and best ever. Last minute work continues on floats and costumes for the parade, which steps off a 9:30 a.m.




(More History)