Palmer begins participant recruitment for NIH-funded research studies


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Posted Online: Jan. 09, 2013, 1:43 pm
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Press release submitted by Palmer College of Chiropractic


Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research seeking local participants for NIH-funded clinical research studies on low back and neck pain

Researchers at the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research (PCCR) have raised chiropractic research efforts to a new level by simultaneously conducting two NIH-funded studies in the Quad Cities—one to assess chiropractic treatment of neck pain and one to evaluate the relationship between back pain and the supportive muscles in the back. The studies are part of a six-year, $2.75 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Quad-City area participants are currently being sought for both studies, which will be conducted at the PCCR clinic facility, 741 Brady St., Davenport, on the Palmer College of Chiropractic campus.

The 80 participants needed for the Patient Response to Spinal Manipulation (PRiSM) study need to be between 21 and 65 years of age and suffer from low back pain. PRiSM focuses on the relationship between back pain and possible abnormal function of the supportive muscles in the back. It is a collaborative study between the PCCR and the University of Iowa.

The Measuring Chiropractic Delivery for Neck Pain Clinical Trial, or MCD Study, will measure three different kinds of chiropractic delivery for 45 people between the ages of 18 and 70 with neck pain or pain in their arms or hands coming from their neck. It also will evaluate pain and function in participants. This is a collaborative study between the PCCR and Loyola University/Hines Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

"These studies are examples of the important work being conducted by Palmer researchers in the area of translational research," said Palmer Vice Chancellor for Research and Health Policy Christine Goertz, D.C., Ph.D., who is principal investigator of the NIH Center grant that supports both of these studies. "Translational research is driven by the premise that to improve human health, scientific discoveries must be translated into practical, everyday applications. The PCCR is a leader in applying translational research to the field of chiropractic. Our research is focused on how to improve delivery of care and patient outcomes for practicing doctors of chiropractic."

Potential participants for both studies will be evaluated at the PCCR clinic to determine whether they qualify. If so, they will be enrolled into one of the studies and receive complimentary care from experienced, licensed doctors of chiropractic for to two to six weeks.

Anyone interested in participating in either study should contact the PCCR clinic facility at (563) 884-5188. Those interested may also go to www.PalmerResearchClinic.com and provide information online in order to be contacted about the studies.

















 



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