Wayne Johnson


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Posted Online: Jan. 03, 2013, 6:57 pm
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The Rev. Wayne L. Johnson, 93, of Rock Island, died Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013, at Trinity Rock Island.
A requiem Mass will be 11 a.m. Saturday at Trinity Anglican Church, 1818 6th Ave., Rock Island. The Rt. Rev. J. Alberto Morales OSB, Bishop of Quincy, will officiate. Visitation is 4 to 6 p.m. today at the Wheelan-Pressly Funeral Home, 3030 7th Ave., Rock Island. Additional visitation is 10 a.m. until service time Saturday at the church. Memorials may be given to the family for a memorial to be designated later.
Wayne L. Johnson was born Jan. 11, 1919, in Minneapolis, Minn., the son of Walfrid and Ruth Walters Johnson. He married Marie L. Bonell on June 30, 1947, in Brookings, S.D.
He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. Father Johnson received his Master of Divinity degree from the Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in Evanston, Ill. He later received an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from the seminary.
Father Johnson was ordained a priest for the Missionary District of the Episcopal Church in South Dakota and served as rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Brookings. He later was called to serve as curate of St. John's Episcopal Church, Decatur, Ill. From 1950 to 1963, he served as rector at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Pekin, Ill.; and from 1963 to 1971, was rector at Trinity Episcopal Church, Rock Island. He was rector at The Church of The Holy Comforter, Kenilworth, Ill., from 1971 to 1985. Following his retirement in 1985, he returned to Rock Island. Father Johnson later served as interim dean at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Davenport.
He was a member of Trinity Anglican Church, Rock Island. Father Johnson served on many church related committees for the Episcopal Dioceses of Springfield, Chicago and Quincy. He enjoyed traveling to South Dakota and Minnesota, where he loved fishing and bird hunting. Father Johnson also enjoyed gardening, playing golf, feeding the birds, and just being in the outdoors.
Survivors include his wife, Marie; daughters and sons-in-law, Patricia and David Arnold, Moline, Teresa and Steven Thompson, Benson, Ill., and Kathryn Nakashima, Encinitas, Calif.; son and daughter-in-law, Christopher and Barb Johnson, Grawn, Mich.; grandchildren, Matthew (Wendy) Arnold, Moline, Julie (Tony) Knaak, Moline, Rebekah (Shawn) Hayes, Benson, Joshua Thompson, Chicago (fiancee, Phyllis Arista, Oak Park, Ill.), Kathalyn, Karalyn and Grace Nakashima, all of Encinitas, and Corey and Tim Johnson, both of Grawn; great-grandchildren, Sullivan and Brielle Arnold, Moline, and Abigail Marie Hayes, Benson; and a sister, Joanne Steelink, South Pasadena, Calif. He was preceded in death by his parents; grandson, Shawn Arnold; and sisters, Dorothy Johnson and Beryl Pyle.
Online condolences may be left at www.wheelanpressly.com.












 



Local events heading








  Today is Tuesday, July 22, the 203rd day of 2014. There are 162 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: Everybody is invited to go on a moonlight excursion next Monday evening on the steamer New Boston. The trip will be from Davenport to Muscatine and back.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The mayor and bridge committee let a contract to the Clinton Bridge company for a $1,125 iron bridge across Sears canal near Milan.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Injunction proceedings to compel the Central Association to keep a baseball team in Rock Island for the remainder of the season were contemplated by some of the Rock Island fans, but they decided to defer action.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The first of the new and more powerful diesel engines built for the Rock Island Lines for the proposed Chicago-Denver run, passed thru the Tri-Cities this morning.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Rock Island Rescue Mission is negotiating for the purchase of the Prince Hall Masonic Home located at 37th Avenue and 5th Street, Rock Island.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Quad Cities Container Terminal is being lauded as a giant business boon that will save several days and hundreds of dollars on each goods shipment to the coasts. The Quad Cities Container Terminal is the final piece of the puzzle that opens up increase access to world markets, Robert Goldstein said.








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