Forget Powerball, Americans already have won life's lottery


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Posted Online: Dec. 02, 2012, 6:00 am
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By Ingrid E. Newkirk
Hope springs eternal, no matter how slim the odds. You can see that in the long lines for Powerball tickets, despite how cold it is outside in most of the 42 states where the jackpot has climbed to hundreds of millions of dollars.

No one can be blamed for wanting to win a windfall that makes "Skyfall," another form of entertainment with long lines, look like a home movie.

With more than $400 million in the bank, you could have a lot of fun, buy a lot of things you need and a lot of stuff you don't, and do an enormous amount of good for those who weren't so lucky, like those poster children with cleft palates, the dogs in animal shelters, impoverished students who ache to go to college, the homeless man who needs a place to hang his hat and tattered coat, and a hopeful inventor in need of a little capital to kick-start her promising idea.

Here's hoping that the odds are in favor of coming Powerball winners who care and want to share.

But even if we don't win the lottery, it's good to remember that in fact, we have all won life's lottery and have good reasons to count our blessings — even those of us who don't think of ourselves as lucky. Someone who has lost a limb in military service or in an accident, say; those of us who have lost our home to a fire or flood; and those of us who can't afford the little luxuries that we would like -- we are all still winners. How so?

When we feel sorry for ourselves, it helps to put things in perspective, to remember that we live in the United States of America, where we have a great many luxuries unknown to most of the world. We don't have to stifle our opinions or get a government-issued pass to travel to another state: We enjoy freedom of speech and freedom of movement.

We are entitled to an education. We do not have to starve or freeze: Someone will provide us with food, shelter and water. If we are down on our luck or out on the street, there are basic support services available from the government and from charities to help us.

And even beyond all of that, we have won life's lottery because we have been born human. Whether you believe we lucked out because of karma or divine intervention or by an accident of birth, just imagine for one moment what life would be like if you had been born a mouse in a laboratory, a dog kept outside on a chain this winter, a bear in a barren enclosure in a roadside zoo or a bird confined to a cage. Just imagine.

This is an appeal to all of us who have won life's lottery by being born into the luckiest 0.0001 percent of life forms: Remember to care and to share, especially during this season of goodwill, Powerball or no Powerball.
Ingrid E. Newkirk is the president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals; www.PETA.org.














 



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  Today is Thursday, July 24, the 205th day of 2014. There are 160 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The Rev. R.J. Humphrey, once a clergyman in this city, was reported killed in a quarrel in New Orleans.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The Rock Island Citizens Improvement Association held a special meeting to consider the proposition of consolidating Rock Island and Moline.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The home of A. Freeman, 806 3rd Ave., was entered by a burglar while a circus parade was in progress and about $100 worth of jewelry and $5 in cash were taken.
1939 -- 75 years ago: The million dollar dredge, Rock Island, of the Rock Island district of United States engineers will be in this area this week to deepen the channel at the site of the new Rock Island-Davenport bridge.
1964 -- 50 years ago: The Argus "walked" to a 13-0 victory over American Container Corporation last night to clinch the championship of Rock Island's A Softball League at Northwest Douglas Park.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Immediate Care Center emergency medical office at South Park Mall is moving back to United Medical Center on Sept. 1. After nearly six years in operation at the mall, Care Center employees are upset by UMC's decision. The center is used by 700 to 800 people each month.








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