LOCAL FOOTBALL SCORING UPDATES PRESENTED BY THE HUNGRY HOBO:

View from QCA: It takes a community clothe a child; you can help


Share
Posted Online: Nov. 19, 2012, 6:00 am
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Kathy Hill-Jones
Runny eyes, noses, chilled arms and mucous-ash covered faces are all pictures of the Quad-Cities elementary school playgrounds as the seasons begin to change from unseasonably warm to cooler temperatures.

Along with these chilling observations, underlie the contagious coughs and sneezes accompanied by fever. This is the daily early morning scenario of school playgrounds across many cities. Each school day between the hours of 7 and 8 in the morning, many children leave for school under dressed for the climate conditions. Playgrounds are saturated with children shivering from the cold, awaiting the school day to begin.

As a former educator and community activist, this scenario is one that permeates my heart. There is an old saying, "It takes a village to raise a child." Today I would like to ponder the simple point; it takes a community to clothe a child.

The economy has forced many households to make the critical decision of prioritizing their budgets. The necessities of food, housing and fuel are the priorities. Many are not able to successfully meet that obligation. There are an astounding number of single- and two-parent households with one wage earner. We are living in times where minimum wage and middle-income wages are just not sufficiently meeting the entire needs of the average American family.

Because of the priorities of parents, they are unable to adequately clothe their children for the seasonal changes. As a former educator, I have seen the need for clothing intervention for many years. As a parent, I found it necessary to purchase warm clothing and winter outerwear for many years.

I thought it was a worthy cause to contribute a portion of my paycheck to help clothe children in my local district. There were many days that the few items I purchased were inadequate in comparison with the children who came to school under-dressed. As the need increased, my clothing allowance fell short. After a couple of years, I incorporated the support of a few other co-workers.

It was then I discovered that it would take an entire community to clothe and meet the needs of this forgotten group of students. I soon began to realize that it wasn't only in my local school, but I realized that this was an epidemic across the Quad-Cities.

There is a huge need to support your local school with clothing the children. Many educators are now concerned with children in their class who don't have proper clothing and are digging into their pockets to help, but they also cannot do it alone.

Schools across the Quad-Cities are maintaining clothing pantries of warm clothing for their students.

Local community organizations and churches are being called upon to help provide warm clothing, food and shelter for struggling families but local schools also need your help.

Contact your district schools and ask about their clothing closet and see how you can be of help this winter season.
My name is Kathy Hill-Jones is a student at Black Hawk College
















 



Local events heading








  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






(More History)