Illinois man finds two-month old $1 million lottery ticket


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Posted Online: Nov. 15, 2012, 4:00 pm
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The Associated Press
GLEN ELLYN (AP) — A suburban Chicago man has collected $1 million from the Illinois Lottery after finding a winning ticket that was sitting on his desk for two months.

The Illinois Lottery presented Ron Yurcus of Glen Ellyn with a ceremonial check on Wednesday. Yurcus won the $1 million in the Aug. 22 Powerball drawing. But Yurcus didn't check his ticket until finding it a few weeks ago. Yurcus says about a dozen tickets accumulated on his desk and he only found the winning ticket when he tidied up for a new computer.

The retired hospital chaplain says he "just about screamed" when he saw he won. Yurcus says he and his wife plan to invest the money, donate to charity and share it with their three children and four grandchildren.

















 




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