Cornfield takes over San Antonio soccer team


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Posted Online: Nov. 14, 2012, 8:50 pm
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Howard Cornfield, former owner of the Quad City Mallards who has earned a reputation as one of minor league sports' top administrators, has been named president and general manager of the San Antonio Scorpions, a member of the North American Soccer League.

Gordon Hartman, CEO of The Gordon Hartman Family Foundation and head of Soccer for a Cause, introduced Cornfield this week during a construction tour of Toyota Field, the new 8,000-seat home of the Scorpions that also will host concerts, community activities and other special events.

Cornfield expressed his enthusiasm for the opportunity to lead the Scorpions, one of the newest franchises in all of sport, as the team gets set to occupy its new, multi-purpose home.

"My goal is to make the Scorpions and Toyota Field synonymous with quality, fun and customer satisfaction," he said. "Most of my pro sports experience has been associated with the game of hockey, yet I believe my experience is a good fit for San Antonio, the Scorpions and thrilling professional soccer."

Cornfield goes to San Antonio from Bettendorf, where since 2005 he was managing director of Beacon Sports Properties International, a finance and consulting company assisting pro sports organizations in China, Australia, Canada and the U.S.

Previously as owner and president of the Quad City Mallards of the United Hockey League (UHL), he guided the franchise through a nine-year period of success unprecedented in professional hockey. The Mallards compiled a 451-175 (.704) record, six consecutive appearances in the league championship series and three UHL championships under his leadership. The Mallards also became the only team in pro hockey history to win 50 or more games in six consecutive seasons, earning a place in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Cornfield also oversaw the highly successful business operations of the franchise as more than 2.7 million fans attended Mallards games during his tenure. He earned a multitude of individual honors including Executive of the Year, Marketing Director of the Year and General Manager of the Year, in addition to being honored as Quad City Times Sports Man of the Year. Just Hockey Magazine also recognized Cornfield as one of the Top Power Brokers in Minor League Hockey.

Cornfield's sports administration experience includes 10 years in NCAA Division I Athletics as associate athletics director at Jacksonville (Fla.) University and Brooklyn (N. Y.) College. He also has international experience with the Australian National Basketball League, Australian National Rugby League and Nepal's ANFA Cup.

Cornfield earned his B. A. degree from the University of South Carolina and an M. A. degree from Jacksonville University. He and his wife, Nancy, have one daughter.

















 




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