Poker tourney to honor the memory of Russ 'Lucky Dog' Scott


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Posted Online: Nov. 06, 2012, 8:16 pm
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By John Marx, jmarx@qconline.com
My former boss loved his poker, and the poker world -- and many, many others -- loved him.

Now they are going to play poker in his honor and give the money raised to a great cause.

A No-Limit Texas Hold 'em Tournament -- dubbed the "Lucky Dog Classic'' to honor the memory of the late Russ Scott -- is slated for 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Arsenal Island Golf Club clubhouse.

There is a $50 buy-in and a $20 add-on. The winner will earn a $500 travel voucher and $1,000 toward a World Series of Poker Tournament buy-in. Additional gift-certificate prizes will be awarded through fifth place.

"The poker world in our area is a close-knit group, and Russ was sort of the mayor of that group,'' said Craig DeVrieze, one of the tournament's organizers. "He was much-loved, and people truly appreciated his gentlemanly demeanor. This, of course, happened while he was taking your money.''

Proceeds will benefit Jason's Box, a Quad-Cities-based organization with the mission of improving the health and well-being of our military men and women.

Jason's Box was founded by Teri Johnson in honor of her son, Cpl. Jason G. Pautsch, who was killed in action April 10, 2009, in Mosul, Iraq. Jason's Box began by sending custom care packages to deployed troops as a way of thanking them for their service.

"It's a wonderful cause,'' said Peggy Gordon, tournament organizer and a longtime friend of Russ Scott. "The tournament is a chance to play in Russ' honor, have a great time and make sure the proceeds from the night go to a great cause. I'm looking forward to it.''

Russ Scott left us in May at the age of 69. He was the managing editor of The Dispatch for 25 years and authored Lucky Dog Poker, one of the most authoritative columns/websites on the subject of poker.

Russ was as kind and understanding a boss as one could have. That said, he also was hard-nosed, had a great sense of how to present the news, and never in the 20 years I worked for him appeared rattled.

On my first full-time day with the Moline Dispatch Publishing Company more than a quarter-century ago, Russ gave me an autographed baseball from St.Louis Cardinals great Stan Musial. It was a calming ice-breaker, a kind gesture I have not forgotten.

"Who knows what the night will bring,'' DeVrieze said of the Lucky Dog Classic. "This is a poker tourney, but most importantly, it is a celebration of Russ 'Lucky Dog' Scott and the gentlemanly nature he exuded at a poker table. We were all lucky to have known and loved the Lucky Dog.''

Yes, we were.

You can reserve your seat by sending your $50 entry fee in care of Jason's Box to Lucky Dog Poker Classic, 122 24th Ave., East Moline, IL 61244, or by registering the day of the event. Credit cards will be accepted. You also may register online at luckydogpoker.com.

Now go ... and win ... and give back to a great cause.






Columnist John Marx can be reached at (309) 757-8388 or jmarx@qconline.com.
















 




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  Today is Wednesday, April 16, the 106th day of 2014. There are 259 days left in the year.
1864 -- 150 years ago: Yesterday some bold thief stole a full bolt of calico from a box in front of Wadsworth's store, where it was on exhibition.
1889 -- 125 years ago: A team belonging to Peter Priese got away from its driver and made a mad run across the Rock Island Bridge. The driver was thrown from his seat but not hurt.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Carlton Taylor was appointed district deputy grand master for the 14th
Masonic District of Illinois.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Moline's million dollar municipal airport was dedicated to air transportation and the national defense by Lt. Gov. John Stelle.
1964 -- 50 years ago: THE ARGUS will be election headquarters for Rock Island County tomorrow night, and the public is invited to watch the operation. The closing of the polls at 6 p.m. will mark the start of open house in the newsroom. Visitors will see staff members receiving, tabulating and posting returns.
1989 -- 25 years ago: Few bricks actually tumbled, but no one seemed to mind as about 1,000 people gathered to celebrate the formal start of demolition at the site of a downtown civic center.




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