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Clyburn promotes Bustos, health care at Augie


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Originally Posted Online: Oct. 25, 2012, 12:05 am
Last Updated: Oct. 25, 2012, 12:12 am
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By Dawn Neuses, dneuses@qconline.com

ROCK ISLAND — Health care was among the topics covered by the assistant Democratic House leader,Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-SC, at an appearance Wednesday morning on behalf of congressional candidate Cheri Bustos.

Mr. Clyburn joined his hosts, the Augustana College Democrats, in urging support for Ms. Bustos, who is challenging Rep. Bobby Schilling, R-Colona, for the 17th District seat in Congress. She said the race will come down to what each candidate stands for.

Rep. Clyburn spoke supportively of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. He said he watched his mother die of cancer. "It not only took her life away but all of her savings," he said.

When his wife had bypass surgery five years ago, she took aspirin to the hospital, knowing what the hospital would charge. Rep. Clyburn said his wife knew medical costs are shifted -- those who have insurance pay for those who don't have insurance, he said.

"So when you make (health care) universal and bring people into the system, it means everybody gets a better existence when it comes to health care and health care delivery," Rep. Clyburn said.

While the Affordable Care Act does not include everything, it is a necessary first step, he said, and will be revisited time and time again.

Rep. Clyburn said if Mitt Romney is elected, he expects the new president to eliminate the Affordable Care Act. "He will sit down on day one and sign an executive order to eliminate Obamacare," Rep. Clyburn said.

"It can be done," he added.

Rep. Clyburn said equal rights face the biggest threat going forward, and said while some people focus on the pro-life/pro-choice debate, he sees the issue as equal pay for equal work. Recent female college graduates still are paid less then men doing the same work, he said.

April Thompson, Moline, asked Rep. Clyburn how anything will get done if Democrats do not take back the House.

Rep. Clyburn said he believes there will be progress if the President is re-elected. Congress is reorganized at the beginning of every new session. He said if the House remains in the hands of Republicans and the Senate remains in the hands of Democrats, the Senate will bring new bills forward.

"There is no way the leadership in the House will keep their fingers in the dike to keep these bills from passing," he said. "I foresee things getting better. We will be OK," he said.
















 



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  Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: The board of education has granted Thursday as a holiday for the children, with the expectation that parents who desire to have their children attend the Scott County Fair will do so on that day and save irregularity the rest of the week.
1889 -- 125 years ago: The guard fence around the new cement walk at the Harper House has been removed. The blocks are diamond shape, alternating in black and white.
1914 -- 100 years ago: The Rev. R.B. Williams, former pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rock Island, was named superintendent of the Rock Island District.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Abnormally high temperatures and lack of rainfall in Illinois during the past week have speeded maturing of corn and soybean crops.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Installation of a new television system in St. Anthony's Hospital, which includes a closed circuit channel as well as the three regular Quad-Cities channels, has been completed and now is in operation.
1989 -- 25 years ago: When the new Moline High School was built in 1958, along with it were plans to construct a football field in the bowl near 34th Street on the campus. Wednesday afternoon, more than 30 years later, the Moline Board of Education Athletic Board sent the ball rolling toward the possible construction of that field by asking superintendent Richard Hennigan to take to the board of education a proposal to hire a consultant.






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