Hemmen, Overstreet are quite the `brother' act for Bees


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Posted Online: Oct. 19, 2012, 8:58 pm
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By Tom Johnston, tjohnston@qconline.com
Kari Hemmen gets to enjoy a unique opportunity every Saturday in the fall football season.

Like any parent of a collegiate football player, she goes to St. Ambrose games to watch her son, Jake, play on the defensive side of the ball.

But when the Bees have the ball, she is just as anxious and focused on the action on the field. That's because she is watching her little brother, Mitch Overstreet, a hulking tight end.

"It's very unique,'' said Kari. "It's very fun. Both are very passionate about athletics, this team and they are good boys. ... It is stressful, too, just because you want them to both be on the field and have the opportunities.''

It is pretty special for the two 22-year-olds to be on the same field together, too, after growing up on opposite sides of the river – Mitch going to Bettendorf High School and Jake being an Alleman prep. It is also quite unique for uncle and nephew to be playing the same collegiate game. Making the relationship even odder is that nephew Jake is about six months older than uncle Mitch.

"It's crazy. People ask us about how we're related and ask us to explain it,'' said Overstreet. "We usually just say we're cousins or best friends.''

Shoot, they might as well be brothers. Even Kari thinks so.

"I think of Mitch as one of my kids and not my brother,'' said Kari, joking about the age difference between the siblings. "He's just been around like a son.''

And Mitch and Jake are like brothers – sometimes best friends, sometimes worst nemesis.

"We were pretty close growing up,'' said Jake. "We'd get in little scuffles all the time. There was one time when we were 3- or 4-years old. I stole his Popsicle and he came up and socked me in the eye.''

Overstreet then recalled a treadmill incident "that I ended up biting it,'' he said.

Laughing, Jake told the story that "he was on the treadmill and I sped it up to the fastest speed and he flies off it.''

Both laugh at the story that tells you a lot about these two.

The two have also been really good for each other, too. Jake was one of the reasons Mitch ended up back home playing football. He had gone to North Dakota to play baseball and football and ended up transferring to Johnson County Community College to play baseball.

"I was a pitcher only and couldn't stand it,'' said Overstreet. "I was stuck at a point where I felt like I made the wrong decision.''

But having Jake on the team and admittedly knowing many of SAU's coaches, he said it was an easy decision to come back home, especially with Jake recruiting him.

"They all had a two-year head start, but I fit right in,'' said Overstreet, who is back on the field after a knee injury kept him out of three games.

Ironically, when Overstreet joined the team, Jake found himself off of it. He ran into some academic problems last year, but is back in good stead this year and is one of the mainstays of a tough SAU defense.

"I felt like I let him down,'' said Jake of his ineligibility issues that are now behind him. "It pushed me more having him on the football team. I was one of the reasons he came here and then I wasn't out there on the field. That gave me more motivation to get back out there.''

Together on the field, the standout athletes are enjoying their "family reunion'' and having fun finally playing on the same team.

They're having some fun off the field, too.

"It's cool,'' said Overstreet, "not having to ask mom or dad to go hang out Jake's house.''

















 



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  Today is Thursday, July 31, the 212th day of 2014. There are 153 days left in the year.

1864 -- 150 years ago: A corps of surgeons now occupies the new hospital quarters at the Garrison Hospital on the Rock Island Arsenal. A fence has been installed to enclose the prison hospital.
1889 -- 125 years ago: B. Winter has let a contract to Christ Schreiner for a two story brick building with a double store front on the south side of 3rd Avenue just west of 17th Street. The estimated cost was $4,500.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Germany sent simultaneous ultimatums to Russia and France, demanding that Russia suspend mobilization within 12 hours and demanding that France inform Germany within 18 hours. In the case of war between Germany and Russia, France would remain neutral.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Civil service offices at the post office and the Rock Island Arsenal were swamped as more than 700 youths sought 15 machinist apprenticeships at the Arsenal.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Last night, American Legion Post 246 in Moline figuratively handed over the trousers to a female ex-Marine and petticoat rule began. Olga Swanson, of Moline, was installed as the first woman commander of the post .
1989 -- 25 years ago: The Illinois Quad City Civic Center captured the excitement and interest of a convention of auditorium managers this weekend in Reno, Nev. Bill Adams, civic center authority chairman, said the 10,000-seat arena planned for downtown Moline has caught the eye of construction firms, suppliers, management teams and concession groups.








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