Moliner's ejection goes viral on YouTube


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Originally Posted Online: Aug. 02, 2012, 2:36 pm
Last Updated: Aug. 02, 2012, 2:46 pm
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By Daniel Makarewicz, danmak@qconline.com

What Derek Dye initially thought would be a humorous move in a tense situation became so much more.

A controversial call Wednesday night during the eighth inning of the high-A Daytona Cubs' home contest against the Fort Meyers Miracle in Daytona Beach, Fla., resulted in Dye playing "Three Blind Mice" over the stadium's public-address system. Within seconds, Dye -- a 2009 Moline High School graduate working as an intern for the Daytona Cubs -- was ejected by home plate umpire Mario Seneca.

"Right when it happened, I didn't know what to expect," Dye said Thursday afternoon. "I'm sure most teams play it. It's pretty common. We've all heard it. I didn't think ejection."

Five minutes later, Dye's phone was buzzing from those who heard about the ejection. As he cleaned the dugouts and clubhouses two hours after that, he said "it got out of control."

The video went viral on the Internet, with multiple nationwide news agencies running the story. Dye, a senior-to-be at the University of Illinois, was discussed on ESPN and will even make an appearance on Friday on "Good Morning America."

"I never expected this," Dye said.

The innocent joke led to Dye's first-ever ejection as an unpaid intern.

With the Cubs leading 2-1 in the eighth inning, shortstop Timothy Saunders fielded a grounder and threw to first baseman Taylor Davis for what appeared to be the first out. The umpire, however, ruled the batter safe as Davis dropped the ball when he grabbed it from his glove to throw around the infield.

The ruling subsequently led to an argument from Daytona manager Brian Harper and Dye playing "Three Blind Mice."

Seneca immediately tossed Dye from the game and ordered, according to the YouTube video, that the sound be stopped for the duration of the game.

"I was like, 'Are you serious?' " Dye said. "After that, I walked into the broadcast booth. I was pretty scared my general manager would be upset."

Actually, Daytona general manager Brady Ballard had Dye's back.

"(Ballard) had a word with (Seneca). I don't think it was pleasant," Dye said. "(Seneca) got out of here in a hurry."

Once he left the music booth, Dye said the press box was "laughing about it." He then joined the team's broadcasters to discuss the incident.

"People are loving it," Dye said.

Asked if he regrets the move, Dye, who actually received a Florida State League-mandated $25 for the ejection, said he has no doubts the song fit the moment.

"Absolutely. There's no harm," Dye said. "Worse things have been played."

All the notoriety from the event still is hard to fathom, he added.

"I thought it would get a little razzle out of the crowd," Dye said. "I didn't expect a whole day of exposure. Right now, it hasn't set it. It's almost surreal."


Watch Derek Dye's ejection on YouTube.
















 



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