Q-C group offers refugees a chance at a better life


Share
Posted Online: March 23, 2008, 9:07 pm
Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
By Reggie Jarrell, rjarrell@qconline.com

America is often called the land of opportunity. Refugees who are resettled here, though, often are just looking for the basics of life.

"Generally, they are looking for safety, to regain control of their lives and to be treated with dignity and respect," said Ann Grove, affiliate director of World Relief in Moline.

World Relief is just one of several international agencies helping in the resettlement of refugees. Since it was established in 1999, more than 525 people have received help through the Moline office.

Ms. Grove said refugees have to be creative just to get out of their countries safely -- sometimes in the midst of civil wars or revolutions.

A key to the resettlement process, she said, is someone to welcome the new residents.

"We want to be one component of a welcoming community that looks beyond the government mandates," said Ms. Grove.

Federal regulations require refugees, within six months of entering the United States, to have worked full time for at least six weeks. They also must reimburse officials any expenses for flying to the United States.

Integration into American society presents its own challenges -- adjusting to a new community, meeting new neighbors, looking for jobs, enrolling children in school and learning to navigate supermarkets and other unfamiliar types of stores.

"The challenges are many, and each individual has his own challenges," said Jack Knepp of Moline, who has helped refugees. "Generally it's easier, if the refugee is initially going through a difficult time, to see people from (his or her) own culture who have made it. This gives them hope."

For refugees, resettlement can be an arduous and lengthy process taking two or more years. They have no choice in where they are being sent, although authorities do try to send refugees to areas where they already have friends and family.

Ms. Grove said the Quad-Cities area, because of the lower cost of living and quality of life, offers advantages to refugees.

"They can get a patch of green (yard), a place to live, kids in school," she said. "It's a good place."

To learn more

For more information about World Relief, call (309) 764-2279 or see www.worldrelief.org.














 



Local events heading








  Today is Wednesday, July 30, the 211th day of 2014. There are 154 days left in the year.
1864 -- 150 years ago: After Sept. 1, every small box of matches will be required to have a 3 cent duty Lincoln stamp on it, and every large box will be one cent for every 100 matches.
1889 -- 125 years ago: Rock Island residents had contributed a total of $1,293 to the American Red Cross for the Johnstown flood relief fund.
1914 -- 100 years ago: Capt. Clark Means, new darkhorse twirler for the ARGUS staff, was in great form in his initial contest as a mound laborer. The result was that THE ARGUS trimmed the Union 6-5.
1939 -- 75 years ago: Hunter and Humprey Moody, young Decatur, Ill, brothers, lack only a few hours of establishing a new world light plane endurance record.
1964 -- 50 years ago: Gates of the 110th annual Mercer County Fair swing open tonight at Aledo for a full week of day and night activity. More that $36,000 will be paid in premiums and race purses.
1989 -- 25 years ago: The baseball field carved out of the cornfield near Dyersville, Iowa, continues to keep dreams alive for hundreds of visitors. Tourists from 26 state and France have visited Dan Lansing's farm to see the baseball diamond seen in the hit movie "Field of Dreams."






(More History)